Alcohol Use by APHAs and Access to Care and Treatment

Title: Alcohol Use by Aboriginal Persons Living with HIV/AIDS and its association with access to care and treatment

Background:

The Public Health Agency of Canada reports that in the parts of Canada that document ethnicity with positive test reports, in 2008 Aboriginal peoples accounted for approximately 8% of persons living with HIV and 12% of all new HIV infections, despite comprising only 6.9% of that population. (PHAC, 2010)

Previous research undertaken by CAAN revealed reports by APHAs that perceptions of health care professionals who assume a tendency to alcohol and drug abuse in their Aboriginal clients, lead APHAs to only seek health services in extreme circumstances. (Jackson, R., & Reimer, G., 2005, February)

Goals/Objectives:

The purpose of this grant proposal is to undertake research exploring the association between alcohol use and access to services from the perspectives of APHAs and service providers using a mixed methodology approach. The interrelated objectives are:

(1) To determine the impact of alcohol use and/or perception of alcohol use on access to services by Aboriginal persons living with HIV/AIDS (APHAs);

(2) To document the extent to which service needs are being enhanced or compromised for APHAs who use alcohol or are perceived to be using alcohol;

(3) To identify and discuss deficiencies in the provisions of services in the context of substance use; and (4) To develop policy and/or practice recommendations based on the findings.

Selected Title

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